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Automated Traffic Enforcement

The Lethbridge Police Service (LPS) Automated Traffic Enforcement (ATE) program includes photo radar and intersection safety devices. These tools, along with traditional enforcement traffic duty and education campaigns, help make Lethbridge’s roads safer by reducing speed and decreasing both the number and severity of collisions.

The LPS adheres to the Automated Traffic Enforcement Guidelines set out by the Government of Alberta

Photo radar is enforcement that captures a photograph of a speeding vehicle.

As a vehicle enters the radar beam it is detected and the speed is calculated. When the end of the vehicle is detected and if that vehicle’s speed exceeds the posted speed limit for the particular location, the system sets off an audible alarm and takes a photo. During low light periods, a flash is incorporated to enhance the image.

When in use, a photo radar vehicle it usually manned by a Community Peace Officer who sets up and tests the equipment. The officer also reviews every picture to verify that a traffic violation has occurred. Once a violation is verified, a ticket is issued and mailed to the vehicle's registered owner. 

There are three (3) photo radar vehicles used in the City of Lethbridge.  

Intersection Safety Devices are cameras that photograph vehicles entering intersections during all phases of the traffic signals.

These cameras can take a photo with more then one vehicle in the picture; each photo taken is lane specific.

Once a traffic violation is detected, a ticket is issued and mailed to the vehicle's registered owner. 

There are two (2) intersection safety devices used in the City of Lethbridge. 

Safety and Transparency

ATE programs are proven to positively change driver behaviour and enhance road safety by reducing the number of collisions, injuries, and fatalities that occur as a result of red-light running and speeding. 

The LPS currently uses 3 photo radar vehicles and 2 intersection cameras within the City of Lethbridge.

In keeping with provincial guidelines, public transparency is paramount of the success of ATE programs. As such:

  • Permanent signs are posted on primary access roads entering Lethbridge to alert the public that photo radar is used as a speed enforcement tool
  • Mobile speed enforcement vehicles have a bright yellow “Drive Safe” sign on them to be more visible to drivers and are parked so that they can be seen without obstruction by the direction of traffic they are monitoring
  • The location of ATE sites is publicly shared with the community

ATE Locations

In keeping with the guidelines set out by the Province of Alberta, ATE sites are selected based on the following criteria: 

  • areas with a higher frequency of collisions
  • areas with a higher frequency of speeding
  • areas with a higher frequency of intersection contraventions (e.g. failing to stop at a red light/stop sign)
  • school/playground zones
  • construction zones
  • areas/intersections where conventional enforcement is unsafe or ineffective

ATEs cannot be used:

  • In speed transition zones
  • In residential areas where speed limits are under 50 km/h

Tickets

Once a traffic violation is verified and a ticket mailed to the vehicle's registered owner, it becomes a Provincial Court matter.

Options for how to address the ticket are listed on the notice/ticket provided. 

Fines for tickets are set by the Province of Alberta. For information about fines and payments, see: 

Revenues generated by the Traffic Safety Act are collected by the Province of Alberta and held by the City of Lethbridge. In accordance with City of Lethbridge Council policy, these funds are used to pay for the ATE program itself, as well as additional traffic safety initiatives identified by the Lethbridge Police Service and the City of Lethbridge Transportation Department.

There are no demerit points associated to any ATE tickets if you plead guilty, as they are issued to the registered owner of the vehicle and not a specific person as the driver.

Your driving record is not affected by ATE tickets. 

Once a ticket is issued to the registered owner it becomes a Provincial Court matter. Options are listed on the violation ticket portion of the document as to how you may address or contest the offence notice/ticket

Frequently Asked Questions

No. Provincial legislation requires the offence notice to be issued to the registered owner of the licence plate on the violating vehicle. The registered owner is therefore the person summoned and is responsible for responding to the offence notice by the date noted on the violation ticket. 

Once a ticket is issued to the registered owner it becomes a Provincial Court matter. Options are listed on the violation ticket portion of the document as to how you may address or contest the offence notice/ticket. 

Braking distances increase in winter road conditions. This increases chances of running red lights and being involved in a crash associated with following too closely. When roads are wet, snowy, or icy, the distance required to come to a full stop increases even more. Drivers need to take this into consideration during winter months. We see an increase of red-light running tickets when weather conditions affect road conditions, which is an indication that drivers need to slow down and leave extra distance between other vehicles and intersections to account for increased braking time.

If your vehicle or license plate has been stolen and you received a ticket during the time it was stolen, please contact the Traffic Response Unit.  Have the ticket number and police file number ready. . 

Licence plates are attached to the Registered Owner and not the vehicle and should be removed prior to selling a vehicle. Once a ticket is issued to the registered owner it becomes a Provincial Court matter. Options are listed on the violation ticket portion of the document as to how you may address or contest the offence notice/ticket. 

Once a ticket is issued to the registered owner it becomes a Provincial Court matter. Options are listed on the violation ticket portion of the document as to how you may address or contest the offence notice/ticket. 

Contact the Traffic Section with the ticket number and details. The ticket will be reviewed and you will be contacted by a member of the Traffic Response Unit advising of the review decision.

Licence plates are attached to a vehicle's registered owner, not the vehicle. As such, the license plate should be removed prior to selling a vehicle.

Once a ticket is issued to the registered owner it becomes a Provincial Court matter. Options are listed on the violation ticket portion of the document as to how you may address or contest the offence notice/ticket.

Contact

Lethbridge Police Service
135 1 Avenue South
Lethbridge, Alberta T1J 0A1

Non-Emergency Phone: 403-328-4444
General Inquiries Phone: 403-327-2210
Email: General Inquiries
(not monitored 24/7)

Hours for public access:
Monday to Friday - 7:30 am to 4:00 pm
Closed weekends and statutory holidays

 

 

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